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Hagerman - Hamlet Playbill Project: Research Component

A guide to image use, searches, and research for your Hamlet Playbill Project.

Noodle Tools

Shakespeare in the JBS Library:

Reference Sources: Check out our reference sources on Shakespeare for books like "The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations from Shakespeare," or "All Things Shakespeare: an encyclopedia of Shakespeare's World," or "Shakespeare A to Z: the Essential Reference to his Plays, his Life, and Times, and More." The Shakespeare reference sources may be found under the call number 822.33.

Other Print Sources: Find more on Shakespeare's literature in the 820s in the normal stacks section of the library. If you are looking for history try a specific catalog search or browse through the 942s.

Start your Research Here (in our collection):

 

Find:
Search Titles Search Authors Search Subjects Search Keywords Search Series

 

Scholarly Resources, Articles, and Information:

Text Work Resources

And the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) listed in the databases above!

Using databases from off campus

You can use any of our databases from off campus if you have the correct user name and password for access. We may not post these publicly, so they reside on a Google Site page that requires your JBS email login for access.

Click HERE to see a clickable list of databases along with their user names and passwords.

Searching "Quick Tips":

  • Use the Advanced Search
  • Use AND to combine keywords and phrases when searching.
  • Use quotation marks to search for exact phrases
  • Don't limit yourself to just one database or one set of search results.
  • When searching for books, use broader terms than when searching for articles.
  • Use the keyboard shortcut Control+F (or Command+F on the Mac) to find a word somewhere on a page. (This works for web pages, PDFs, and Word documents!)
  • Ask a librarian if you have questions!